How We Upgraded an Obsolete Ruby on Rails Application with Lots of Legacy Code (part 1)

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As a development consultancy, we deal with a whole lot of projects: static websites, web platforms, intranets, mobile apps, etc. Some are bigger, and some are smaller, but all of them require maintenance.

This post is the first one of a series where we break down how to correctly upgrade a Ruby on Rails application.

In this first part, I am going to introduce you to the project and how we planned the upgrade minimising risks because the project is already live.

We Don't Need a CEO (Lessons Learnt in Two Years Running a Development Consultancy)

Diario del capitán, fecha estelar d577.y36/AB

This is a follow-up to last year's Lessons Learnt: One Year Running Our Own Business, in which we shared all we had learnt in our first year operating as a development consultancy in Barcelona.

After two years, we're stronger than ever. Alive and kicking.

How to Build CSS Grids: Floats vs Inline Blocks

Diario del capitán, fecha estelar d447.y36/AB

At MarsBased we're very keen on sharing everything we learn. That's why we recently published our HTML & CSS Guidelines, and our blogging tips or the lessons learnt in our first year running the company, among other stuff. In this entry, you will learn how to build CSS grids by comparing the two most popular approaches.

The MarsBased CSS & HTML Guidelines

Diario del capitán, fecha estelar d406.y36/AB

Since we started MarsBased, we've completed a good share of projects. From all of them we've learnt something useful. But all this knowledge should be stored somewhere for further use, for instance, to train new developers.

Pretty much like we did with the release of the MarsBased blogging guide (part 1, part 2), we want to share what we have learnt about HTML5 & CSS3 with you all.

Things should not only work well. They can also look good.

Frontend developers, this one is for you.

Code Refactoring: When, Why and Who

Diario del capitán, fecha estelar d365.y36/AB

The rise of tech companies has caused a higher adoption of technology among new generations. People are learning how to code in order to keep up with the times, or to reinvent themselves professionally to unlock new paths in their career.

The more we code, the more we need to make it a sustainable practice. Quantity almost never implies quality.

Enter code refactoring. Everyone talks about what refactoring is, and how to do it, but we want to talk about the other three dimensions: when to do it, why, and who should do it.

Estás a un paso de conocer a tu mejor socio.

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